Stainless Steel Bolts

Stainless steel bolts are used in a wide variety of applications due to its major physical characteristic, stainless steel. Bolts are threaded fasteners that are able to provide secure connections in a variety of uses in construction, wood working, manufacturing and several others industries.

Stainless steel is an ideal material choice for bolt fabrication as it is a durable and strong metal. As industrial bolts are used most often for high stress and heavy duty applications with regard to resistance in relation to weight, they need to be constructed from a material that can withstand the tension of the external load. When bolts are used as components of larger machinery and vehicles, they are required to be strong enough to hold the moving parts securely. For exterior and marine applications, stainless steel is a particularly suitable material choice as it has high corrosion resistance and does not require coatings or finishing to ensure its protection from the elements.

Bolts are used in many applications with exposure to the elements, and rust or corrosion can weaken other metals, causing potential structural failure or damage. They can be fitted or inserted in a number of different ways using screw drivers, high pressure drills or wrenches. Specific types of bolts like anchor bolts are set into wet concrete to provide a secure connecting point.

The wide range of uses for industrial bolts means that there are a number of different types in terms of shape and capabilities. The most common designs for stainless steel bolts are eyebolts, which have a circular top or “eye” in place of a normal head to allow for cables or ropes to be attached. Other common types include U-bolts which are shaped in the form of a U with threading on both ends to provide a strong loop to secure items to. Stainless steel may also be used to make hex bolts, lag bolts, and carriage bolts which are used in a wide variety of industrial and manufacturing applications.

The threading on bolts can be coarse or fine. Typical ISO standards for threading specifications are that the length is twice the diameter of the bolt plus ½ inch. Threading is determined in part by the application and also by the intended load upon the bolt itself. Fine threads are typically found on smaller bolts with lighter-weight applications. Heavy duty bolts will typically have coarse threading to ensure maximum grip between the bolt and the securing material.